Galleria Gottardo, Shimaoka Tatsutzo  

4. Slip Dripping (Trailed Glaze)

The bold strokes of slip that cross the surface of the vessel, called nagashimon decoration, are usually created by dripping coloured slip from a ladle. The clays and glazes of Mashiko are not suited to intricate decorations, and before Hamada arrived, Mashiko ware were simple, rustic pieces in persimmon glaze with an ample splash of black glaze naturally trailing down from the mouth. Hamada adopted this simple decoration, and added bold ladled splashes and strokes to his large dishes. Shimaoka's technique is basically the same, but the effect is strikingly different as the vessels already have patterns of rope-impressed inlay before this decoration is applied. As bold slip decorations are usually with large-size and flat pieces, the inlaid pattern looks very intricate and delicate on the large surfaces. When they are combined, the contrasting delicate inlay pattern and bold slip strokes enhance each other's effect.

In the group of works that are decorated with slip drippings, we can clearly see that rope-impressed inlay is a technique to form the body surface of a vessel, instead of a method of adding decoration. That is why this technique can allow other decorative elements to be added upon it while it can also endow a sophisticated beauty to a vessel itself.  

italiano
 
 

Click here to enter the different descriptive sections of the exhibition.
Tecniques Not Used with Robe Impressed Inlay.
Mixed Techniques.
Colouration.
Salt Glaze.
Kiln Effects.

TEXTClick here for reading the introductions.
Luca Patocchi, Curator of the Galleria Gottardo.
Adolf Zihler, collector.
Yanagi Sori, Message from the Japan Folk Crafts Museum, Tokio.
Bibliography
Biography and most important exibits from Shimaoka Tatsutzo           


SHIMAOKA HOME
 

ADHIKARA
CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

CAPRIASCA

ADHIKARA - BOOKS

ADHIKARA - LIVRES

ADHIKARA - BCHER

ADHIKARA - LIBRI    

                       
ENTRANCE:  CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE SHIMAOKA EXHIBITION